Michael is from Colorado which provides him with what seems like an infinite number of fabulous locations to photograph. This includes mountains, open vistas, interesting geological formations, lakes, streams, waterfalls, etc. Colorado also has an abundance of wildlife, and Michael enjoys the challenges of photographing birds and animals in their natural habitat.

The camera is now an essential item that he takes along while out enjoying other hobbies such as fly fishing, hiking and backpacking. When it comes to outdoor landscape and nature photography, Michael is a firm believer in the need to protect our parks and wilderness areas, and always follow the “leave no trace” principles.

getting started with photography.

“I became interested in photography in january, when I purchased a camera to capture the beautiful landscape scenes that I often came across while hiking and fly fishing in the mountains of Colorado.  Soon after purchasing my first DSLR camera, I joined a local photography club to meet other photographers and learn how to use the new gear. Over these past five years I have actively read books, watched tutorials and attended workshops in an effort to learn and improve my skills.”

buying your first camera.

“My first camera was an entry-level camera that I purchased in March. I quickly became passionate about photography and upgraded to a full frame camera  I am currently using a  mirrorless camera as well as a that has been converted to infrared.”

Each month we spend some time with one of you, the everyday photographer. On The Photographer Show, we share our love of photography and discuss a few images to learn more about our readers and the Community members.

This month, we’re joined by Michael Ryno from the Denver, CO area. Living in this area provides him with what seems like an infinite number of fabulous locations to photograph. This includes mountains, open vistas, interesting geological formations, lakes, streams, waterfalls, etc. Colorado also has an abundance of wildlife. Mike enjoys the challenges of photographing birds and animals in their natural habitat.

Tips for Outdoor Photography

  1. Carry a tripod. The easiest way to improve your photographs is to use a tripod. You’ll get clearer photos, and a slower shutter speed can allow you to take a deeper depth of focus.
  2. Shoot during the “magic hour.” Plan your hikes around good light. The hours at the beginning and end of the day will yield exceptional photos. The rest of the day pales in comparison.
  3. Use supplemental lighting. Sometimes nature’s lighting isn’t the best for photography. Simple, supplemental lighting from fill-flash, reflectors, and even strobes can do wonders for your photos. An example of composing a photo using the ‘rule of thirds.’
  4. Avoid the “bullseye.” When composing your photo, throw things off center on purpose. Use the “rule of thirds,” which imagines your photo divided into a three-by-three grid, with the horizon and important elements of the photo found within or along the lines of that grid.
  5. Less is more. Simplify your photos. Pick out the most important element you see and focus in on it.